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Spousal contributions and contributions split

By Gary Chau, Lawyer, and William Fettes, Senior Associate, DBA Lawyers Introduction There are a few different ways that individuals can contribute money into superannuation for the benefit of their spouse. Taking advantage of these contribution options can help spouses achieve parity in relation to their respective super account balances over time and provide increased [read more]

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Who is your relative for SMSF purposes and why is this relevant?

Joseph Cheung, Lawyer and David Oon, Senior Associate, DBA Lawyers It is important to understand who is an individual’s relative for superannuation law purposes as the Superannuation Industry (Supervision) Act 1993 (Cth) (‘SISA’) imposes certain boundaries on an SMSF’s activities in relation to an individual’s relative or related party. There are two definitions of the [read more]

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Why should you order trusts from DBA Lawyers?

Gary Chau, Lawyer, and Daniel Butler, Director, DBA Lawyers Introduction While DBA is recognised as Australia’s leading SMSF law firm, it is  also well known for it’s great depth of tax and trusts expertise. In particular, DBA Lawyers offers an excellent discretionary trust deed that is easy to read, provides great flexibility and reflects the [read more]

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Limited recourse borrowing arrangements can use one bare trustee for multiple bare trusts

Gary Chau, Lawyer, and David Oon, Senior Associate, DBA Lawyers Introduction A common question we get asked when a client’s self managed superannuation fund (‘SMSF’) is undertaking a limited recourse borrowing arrangements (‘LRBA’) is whether there needs to be a separate bare trustee (usually a company) for each bare trust. The short answer is no. [read more]

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Traps that turn your non-geared unit trust into an in house asset

By Joseph Cheung, Lawyer and David Oon, Senior Associate, DBA Lawyers A reg 13.22C non-geared unit trust (‘NGUT’) is not included as an in-house asset (‘IHA’) at the time of the initial investment provided certain criteria is met. Some trustees may think that they are investing in a reg 13.22C NGUT on the basis that the [read more]

Unlocking potential and avoiding pitfalls in SMSF property development

Unlocking potential and avoiding pitfalls in SMSF property development

Some may think that property development in an SMSF contravenes superannuation law. However, that is overstating the position. There is no blanket ban on property development in SMSFs. Rather, like many investments an SMSF can make, the key to compliance is on how the investment occurs. Extreme caution should be exercised before and during, since [read more]

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Many strategies are based on the proportioning rule

Co-author by Daniel Butler, Director, DBA Lawyers Introduction We have had numerous queries about the proportioning rule over recent times. A common query is how does the proportioning rule apply and how do you calculate the tax free and taxable components in a superannuation benefit. This article is to assist you understand the fundamentals of [read more]

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Can an SMSF trustee ever acquire residential property from a related party?

Many would say that the trustee of an SMSF is prohibited from ever acquiring residential property from related parties of the SMSF (including members). However, there are three main circumstances where this could happen without contravening superannuation law. All of the circumstances involve the concept of ‘business real property’. Business real property Broadly, SMSF trustees [read more]

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You should have a sole purpose corporate SMSF trustee

Australian Taxation Office statistics suggest that a large majority of SMSFs have individual trustees. This is troubling, considering that sole purpose corporate SMSF trustees have been known to be superior for many years. This covers the main reasons to have a sole purpose corporate trustee. The ‘sole purpose’ indicates that the company only acts in [read more]